How to Handle Cops During Traffic Stops

How to Handle Cops During Traffic Stops

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Police generally need a warrant to search you or your property, but during a traffic stop, police only need probable cause. Probable cause means that the police has some facts or evidence to believe that you’re involved in some kind of criminal activity.

Also check out this article on what to do when you get pulled over. 

Click here to see what kinds of cars drug dealers should be driving.

In other words, an officer’s hunch without evidence of illegal activity is not enough to legally search your car. Before searching, he must observe something real. Common examples of probable cause include weapons or drugs in plain sight. The presentation of any of these facts would allow an officer to perform a search and make an arrest.

Be aware that minor traffic violations such as: speeding, broken tail-light, or expired registration are not considered probable cause.

To keep the police from searching your car

Most police are able to exploit a major loophole to the probable cause search requirement, but by following these basic rules, you’ll be better able to prevent the police from tricking you into giving up your constitutional rights. You’ll also improve your odds of driving away safely.

Always Be Calm & Cool

If the police flag you down, pull over, turn off your car, turn off your phone, hide any stuff that’s laying around, and place your hands on the wheel. Police like to see your hands for their own safety, they’re bitches so wait until they request your paperwork before reaching for it. Make sure that you swallow all of the drugs while they check your papers in their squad car.

Always stay cool with the police: Never talk back to them, raise your voice, or use profanity with a police officer. Being hostile with the police is dangerous because it could get you shot or arrested. You’ve got to play it smart with these fools.

Never Say Too Much When Talking to the Police

The police may try to get you to admit to having broken a law. For example, an officer may ask, “Do you know how fast you were going?”

You may assert your 5th Amendment protection against self-incrimination by refusing to admit you might have broken a law. As such, the best answer to that and similar questions is “No, Officer.”

Because anything you say can and will be used against you in court, the less you say the better. You also don’t want to announce to police that you know your rights. They’ll take that as a challenge. Just keep quiet and calm.

Refuse Any Search Requests

Police may order the driver and any passengers out of the vehicle. If this happens, step out of the car. If they have reasonable suspicion to detain you, police may frisk the outside of your clothing to check for weapons, but only if they have a basis for suspecting you’re armed.

If police detain and frisk you, you have the right to clearly state your refusal to consent to the search. For example, you may say “Officer, I’m not resisting. I do not consent to this search.” But you should only verbally refuse. Never physically resist. Just touching an officer could get you tasered or shot. You could also get a felony charge for assaulting a police officer.

Whether they frisk you or not, police may ask you a series of questions. They’ll probably include something like “You don’t mind if I have a look in your car?” Beware of that question: It’s the legal loophole that the officer wants to snare you in. It might even sound like a command, but it’s technically a request.

In response to such request, you may politely decline by saying “Officer, I know you’re just doing your job, but I don’t consent to searches.” Some officers may use their authority to make you feel obligated to prove your innocence by asking “What do you have to hide?” Don’t fall for such tricks. If necessary, repeat your refusal.

Remember: The 4th Amendment protects your right to refuse search requests, but it doesn’t require police to tell you about your right to refuse. In fact, consenting to searches automatically makes them legal in the eyes of the law. So if you’re pulled over, don’t try to figure out whether or not the officer has probable cause to legally search you. You always have the right to refuse searches.

Refusing a search request is not an admission of guilt and does not give the officer the legal right to search or detain you. In fact, most avoidable police searches don’t occur because police have probable cause. They occur because people get tricked or intimidated into consenting to search requests.

If police search your car and find illegal items despite your refusal, your lawyer can file a motion to suppress or throw out the evidence in court. If the judge agrees that the officer’s search violated the 4th Amendment’s probable cause requirements, she’ll grant the motion. Unless the prosecution has other evidence, your charges would be dismissed.

Determine if You’re Free to Go

Unless you’re detained or arrested, you may terminate the encounter anytime. But don’t wait for the officer to dismiss you. Ask if you’re free to go. For example, if an officer threatens to call in a K-9 unit if you refuse a search, you should ask “Officer, are you detaining me, or am I free to go?”

Not only can this line can help withdraw you from an encounter, it also deflects any of the officer’s probing questions or threats. So if an officer says “If you cooperate with me, everything will go easy for you.” You may respond by saying either “Officer, I don’t consent to any searches” or “Officer, am I free to go?”

If the officer lets you leave, do so immediately. If the officer’s answer is unclear, or if he asks additional questions, persist by repeating “Officer, am I free to go?”

Ask for a Lawyer

If you are not free to go, you are being detained. The officer might have some reason to suspect you of a crime, and you may be arrested.

In such a situation, your magic words are “I’m going to remain silent. I would like to see a lawyer.” These magic words are like a legal condom. They’re your best protection if you’re under arrest.

Never rely on police to inform you of your right to remain silent and always see a lawyer. Repeat the magic words as necessary, but say no more. Remember that anything you say can and will be used against you in court.

Special Thanks to www.flexyourrights.org

 

2 comments

  1. Here’s my license, registration and insurance card.

    “I respectfully refuse to answer any questions and decline any request to search my person or vehicle”.

    Repeat if necessary.

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